Category Archives: Selling Whisky

Whisky Evaluation Day in Elgin, 23rd May

Wayne and Harrison from Whisky-Online Auctions will soon be travelling north of the border to offer free evaluations and auction advice, so if you live anywhere near Elgin and have some whiskies you’d like us to value, listen up!

Whisky-Online Auctions will be holding a Free Evaluation Open Day in Elgin from 10am-2pm on Wednesday 23rd May.  The boys will be setting up in the delightful surroundings of the Laichmoray Hotel on Maisondieu Road in Elgin and anyone can come along with their whiskies (or photos of their bottles) to take advantage of their comprehensive valuation skills.

We also have a great record of auctioning casks of whisky, so if you’d like us to value those as well just let us know the details of your cask and we can advise you.

It doesn’t matter if you’ve got one bottle you found in your attic or a vast collection amassed over decades – Wayne and Harrison will give you honest, confidential advice on the likely prices your liquid gold could achieve at auction.

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Whisky-Online Auctions is a family company with a long history in the business and the highest standards of professional integrity. All advice is given freely with absolutely no obligation on your part.

If you decide to auction your bottles we’ll be happy to organise that for you, and if you don’t, no problem – at least you’ll know how much your whisky is worth.

So if you’ve got some whisky and you’re not sure how much to insure it for, or you’re thinking of cashing in and treating yourself with the proceeds, come along to the Laichmoray Hotel on 23rd May and let us take the doubt and hard work out of the auction process for you.

If you want to come along, let us know on 01253 620 376 or auctions@whisky-online.com. Appointments aren’t strictly necessary, but might save you time if there’s an Antiques Roadshow-style queue!

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The Best Way To Get Your Bottle(s) To Us

So, you’re most likely here because you’ve received your free valuation and now wish to proceed. You have four options to choose from to get your bottle(s) to us – deciding which is  the best option for you will depend on what you’re auctioning.

Here are your options with a brief overview of how each one works.

1. Courier Collection (UK Only)

With a cost of only £12, our courier collection is the most popular option for sellers based in the UK who have a single bottle, a small number of bottles or low-valued bottles. At the moment we’re using DHL to conduct these collections. Each parcel can weigh up to 10kg – if your parcel weighs more please let us know and we’ll advise if this will incur additional costs. It is your responsibility to wrap & pack your bottle(s) securely.

How to prepare your parcel

We recommend wrapping each bottle in several layers of bubble wrap – if you have any bottles with presentation boxes, make sure you fill the space inside ensuring the bottle does not rattle around. All bottles should be stood upright in a strong cardboard box; again ensuring all spaces are filled.  Please include your personal details inside the box: Full Name, Telephone Number, Address & Email.

How to book in your collection

We’ve made booking in your collection as easy as possible. Simply call our office on 01253 620376 and one of our lovely girls will organise all this for you. You will have to select a day when someone will be in all day to hand over your parcel. We will send you a tracking number so you can keep an eye on its status.

The good thing about this service is that once DHL have collected, we receive your parcel the following day; so we recommend Monday – Thursday to ensure your parcel is not held in the hub over the weekend.

Once your parcel has landed with us we will notify you by email. We will also create you an account on our website so you can track your bottles once our auction has gone live. Details for this will be attached to the email.

Please note parcels are not insured as you’re wrapping them yourself. However, insurance does not prevent breakages, taking your time to ensure your parcel is wrapped securely will. If you need further advice on how to wrap & pack your bottles, please feel free to contact us.

2. Use Your Own Courier

You’re more than welcome to source your own courier. This option is generally used by those who may have their own contract with a courier. If you’re going to use your own courier or the Post Office, please enquire if you’re allowed to post alcohol. And of course, if it’s going to cost you more than £12 you’ll be best using our service. Again, please include your personal details inside the box: Full Name, Telephone Number, Address & Email.

3. Visit Us In Blackpool

Our warehouse is situated in the sunny seaside town of Blackpool and you’re more than welcome to drop your bottles off in person. Generally, those who choose this option will wander Blackpool before or after their visit with us. Being a tourist town, there’s a whole host of things to do if you want to make a day of it. If you’d like to stay the night or even the weekend you’ll have thousands of hotels to choose from.

The main route is Junction 32 off the M6 onto the M55. We’re a stones throw from Blackpool Tower & The Winter Gardens. Our showroom is an Aladdin’s cave of whisky and boasts a large collection we’ve accumulated over 25 years. We have free parking on the front and a loading bay at the side, and we’re happy to assist with any lifting.  So, if you want to drop your bottles off personally, contact us today to make an appointment.

Contact Details

Tel: 01253 620376
Email: auctions@whisky-online.com
Address: Units 1-3 Concorde House,
Charnley Road,
Blackpool,
FY1 4PP (sat nav use)

Opening Times
Monday – Friday: 9am – 5pm
Excluding Bank Holidays

4. Personal Home Collection

We offer free personal home collections for large collections and high valued items. These are conducted by our directors and whisky specialists Wayne & Harrison Ormerod. Each month they travel down South and up North.

Their main route is the M6 and surrounding areas to London. This is usually on the Wednesday two weeks before our auctions go live. The following Wednesday they go up the M6 covering Glasgow, Falkirk, Edinburgh, Dundee, Aberdeen & Elgin. If you’re not in these locations or you’re unsure whether we cover your area please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Please note, we do not offer home valuations. If you require valuations please get in touch with us beforehand.  Home collections are subject to consignment. This means once you have arranged for a collection, you’re happy to proceed. When the lads arrive they will talk you through the auction process and answer any questions you may have. They will write out all the bottles they take away and issue you with a receipt. Your bottles will be fully insured whilst in transit and of course when they arrive at our premises.

Please appreciate that we have to consider whether it is going to be economical to offer a personal collection. If you are unsure whether you are eligible please do not hesitate to get in touch.

To enquire about a free personal collection please contact Harrison on 01253 620376.

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August 2017 Auction Results

August whisky auction results

An interesting set of lessons, trends and results from last night’s impressive auction. It’s been a while since a Cadenhead Dumpy topped the auction but it’s unsurprising in this case as that bottle was the extremely rare Laphroaig 1967 15-year-old sherry cask. From sibling stock to the fabled Samaroli 1967 the hammer finally fell at £7100. An impressive price but somewhat unsurprising given the almost hallowed status these whiskies are now afforded.

Elsewhere the Clynelish Royal Marine Hotel bottling fetched a record equalling £5100, the appetite for these bottles is understandably quite immense given the legendary quality of the liquid. However, the likes of old Clynelish is not as ‘obvious’ as certain Islay or Speyside distilleries and says a lot about the very specific tastes of serious whisky aficionados these days.

It’s unusual to see a Cognac so close to the top of the sale but Frapin’s ancient Cuvee Francois Rabelais commanded an impressive final price of £5100. Followed on the heels by a bonded cask of Tullibardine 2007 at £3700. Given the prices paid for other casks recently at WOA this might seem small fry but given that these kinds of casks can be picked up privately for around half this price if you know where to look then it looks increasingly like auction is the place to sell your casks.

 

Johnnie Walker 30 Year Old - Sir Alexander Walker - Master Blender Collection

Johnnie Walker once again proved its brand power with its 30-year-old Sir Alexander Walker edition hitting £3300. While the Caol Ila Manager’s Dram spiralled yet higher to £3000. How long before this one follows the other dark sherry / heavy peat legends past the £5000 mark? Not long I suspect.

Perhaps one of the more curious results was the bottle of 1802 Reserve Terrantez Madeira. This bottle is almost certainly a 1802 solera rather than a vintage and, although a remarkable wine no doubt, £2600 is still a pretty hefty price for such a bottle. Just goes to show what can happen when two people really want something.

The rest of the upper end of the sale was full of consistent higher market value results and few surprises. The Gordon & MacPhail Silver Jubilee series could be picked up for around £300-400 each not so long ago and a full set performed exceptionally well in last night’s sale. However, that the Macallan fetched £1750 says a lot about the continuing power of this distillery amongst a new generation of buyers. That this kind of buying willpower is starting to incorporate the independent bottlings as well as the official ones now suggests the ‘Macallan madness’ is far from over.

There were further strong results from Laphroaig with the 1967 First Cask and the 1976 official vintage both hitting £1450. Other impressive results around this level included the SMWS Music, Food, Friends, Words set at £1150, the Glengoyne 1968 single cask 4615 at a mighty £1100 and Glenfiddich 8-year-old for NAAFI stores at £925. Another rarely seen bottle was the official Glentauchers 5-year-old bottled for France in the 1980s which finished up at £825 – not surprising given the rarity of this bottling.

Bruichladdich had a strong showing with three of its Legacy bottlings – editions 1, 3 and 6 – finishing up at £750 and £725 a piece respectively. It seems word is starting to get around about aged Bruichladdich, shouldn’t be long before these sorts of bottlings start to crack the four-figure threshold.

The mid-range of the sale is usually where we see the most consistency and the fewest surprises and this was very much the case again last night with almost all bottles selling for their upper market value. Some notable results include the Highland Park Thor at £440 showing this series now comfortably resurged after a dip. The Bowmore 12-year-old litre 1970s bottling for £360 shows these bottlings creeping up incrementally. Although, given the quality of the liquid, these are arguably still fair value.

Scanning through the rest of the auction for bargains is – once again – hard work with slim pickings. The fact that this has become kind of a mantra in these posts speaks volumes about the way knowledge about older whiskies has proliferated. What remains to be seen is just how many of these bottles are being snapped up under the guise of investment, or by people with deep pockets and a taste for exquisite whisky. Time will tell but for now, prices remain high and – barring a smattering of unusual and interesting bottles beneath the £100 mark – it remains a tough market for people looking to buy serious whisky for drinking. If you’re a seller on the other hand… well, the sky is by no means the limit. Until next time…

August Whisky Auction Highlights


 

Next Auction Starts Wednesday 27th September

If you are looking to sell your whisky and would like to take advantage of our  5% sellers commission, record hammer prices and fast payouts then contact us today to get your FREE valuation, Expert Advice and take part in our next auction.

Get in touch!
Call: 01253 620 376 | Mobile: 07767 22 22 00
Email: auctions@whisky-online. com

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July 2017 Auction Results

Top three Auction Results July 2017

There are two very interesting results at the top end of this month’s auction. Firstly we learn that the market value for that Ardbeg 1974 is £15,100. This bottling has changed hands privately a few times but this was the first time in a long while that it had been seen at auction. Understandably, given that there are – or were – only 36 bottles in existence, it finished up at a whopping five figure sum, by far the most expensive bottle of Ardbeg sold at auction.

Secondly, it was interesting to see the result of the cask of Port Charlotte 2004 which finished up at £9300. A solid and impressive result but also perhaps much more in line with regular market prices for bonded mature stocks – especially after the extremes of last month’s two 1993 Macallans. This was a terrific cask of Port Charlotte so, whoever bought it, can expect a pretty great bottling from it when the time comes.

Auction Results - Brora 1972 Rare Malts

Other notable examples from the upper end of the sale were the Macallan 40-year-old 2016 release at £7300 – an impressive climb from its initial retail price. There was also an interesting disparity between the three bottles of Brora 1972 Rare Malts. Each was the ever so slightly more common 58.7% version. They finished up at £5900, £3300 and £3000 respectively, interestingly enough the descending prices matched the filling levels in each bottle. You might argue that this is three bottles in one sale having an overall effect on pricing but I doubt that the price – fill level correspondence is coincidental. The fact that the only bottle with the fill level well into the neck fetched a whopping £5900 – almost double the cheapest bottle – says a lot about the power of the fill level in these kinds of bottlings.

Another rather telling result was the Cadenhead Dumpy 1965 Clynelish which fetched £4700. It seems that almost all great old whiskies such as this one are now hovering around the £5000 mark or higher.

The Macallan 30-year-old blue box hit an impressive £4100, it’s looking increasingly likely that this bottle’s new trading level is set to remain above the £4000 mark from here on out. Similarly, the Port Ellen festival cask bottling finishing at £3400 suggests this bottling is unlikely to be picked up for anything below the £3000 mark anytime soon. The Ardbeg 1815 edition fetched £3300 which goes to show that if you set a bottle’s initial retail price on the high side then it’s often a slow burn at auction before it starts to climb higher.

Back to Macallan and the old 18-year-olds just seem to be going from height to heigh with the 1967 vintage fetching a whopping  £2400 and the 1971 £2100. Add to that the fact that even the Diamond Jubilee release is now hitting £2350 and the 1980 Gran Reserva at £2100 and you start to wonder if there will soon be any older limited edition Macallans available below the £2000 mark?

Browsing through the rest of the upper end of the sale the Laphroaig 1967 27-year-old First Cask edition jumps out at £2050. Like almost all 1960s Laphroaigs now, these bottlings are fought over more and more keenly each time they turn up at auction. Understandable given the almost otherworldly brilliance of the liquid. Speaking of brilliant liquid, other similar results were the Talisker 100 proof NAS bottling for £1350, the 1977 Brora Douglas Laing for £1300 and the Laphroaig Cairdeas 30-year-old for £1000. All terrific drams with solid results driven by the sheer desirability of the liquid.

Glenmorangie 30-year-old looks to go from strength to strength with the Oloroso version selling for an impressive £1300. Similarly, the Bunnahabhain 1965 nudged past the four figure mark to a healthy £1050; nice to see these old Bunna bottlings getting the attention they deserve. Likewise, the 34-year-old Bunnahabhain fetched a solid £725 as well.

Another whisky which is gaining increasing attention at auction is Ledaig 1972, this vintage has long been well regarded and more and more people are now cottoning on with the Connoisseur’s Choice bottling fetching £750. Not to mention the Douglas Murdoch 20-year-old Ledaig hitting an eye-catching £625 – not so long ago this bottling could be scooped up for £150-200.

Moving further down the sale some other solid results were the Clynelish Flora & Fauna 1982 Cask Strength bottling for £430. The Campbell & Clark 1969 Glen Mhor for £400, these have always been some of the best Glen Mhor bottlings and it’s nice to finally see them moving on from the £200-250 range. After this, we tend to get into more familiar territory where everything seems to be hitting the upper end of its natural market value. It seems genuine bargains are increasingly a thing of the past at whisky auctions as more and more new buyers emerge and educate themselves on old and rare whiskies.

A 12-year-old 1980s ceramic flagon of Springbank for £130 looks like something of a steal considering how terrific these old Springbanks can be. Similarly, a 16-year-old White Horse Lagavulin at £125 looks pretty good considering most have been around the £160 mark lately. And of course, a Speyburn 1974 Connoisseur’s Choice for £82.50 is a pretty serious bargain too! But beyond this, the thing that strikes most is more surprise at just how much some bottles have climbed during the past year. Even types of whiskies such as old blends that would once have been around the £40 mark and heading up towards three figures. One thing is for sure, interest in whisky, be it old and rare, modern or unusual, is only going from strength to strength.

Whisky Auction Bottle Highlights

Next Auction Starts Wednesday 30th August

If you are looking to sell your whisky and would like to take advantage of our  5% sellers commission, record hammer prices and fast payouts then contact us today to get your FREE valuation, Expert Advice and take part in our next auction.

Get in touch!
Call: 01253 620 376 | Mobile: 07767 22 22 00
Email: auctions@whisky-online. com

 

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March Auction Results 2017

If last night’s sale proved anything it is that, for the right bottles, Macallan is still the unassailable king at auction. The first edition Lalique 50-year-old finished up at a whopping £65,210. There’s been a lot of chatter about the charity sale of the full Lalique set in Hong Kong recently, but this record result is more impressive for the fact this was not a charity sale which makes this not only the most expensive Macallan auctioned in the UK to date but also the most expensive non-charity bottle sold at any UK auction thus far. How long that record will stand is anyone’s guess in today’s constantly surprising market. But this remarkable and telling result must surely be causing collectors to think long and hard about top end bottles they might have stashed away. What would top the Lalique? Possibly certain Japanese bottles and definitely the Peter Blake 60-year-old Macallan – if one ever surfaces again – and the 1926 Fine & Rare would certainly be the other strong contender.

March Auction Records

You know it’s a pretty special auction when the Macallan 1928 50-year-old is second on your list of bottles to talk about. The fact that this legendary bottle finished up at – again a new record price – £25,100, even without a box and not in tip top condition speaks volumes about the desirability and potency of this famous bottling. On the flip side, however, the fact it sold for less than half the price of the Lalique also says something about the unique power of Macallan’s modern day iconic series. How long before we see another one of these bottlings? Who knows, but one in perfect condition can’t be far off the £30,000 mark next time around…

Karuizawa 1964 - 48 Year Old

Looking through the other highlights in the upper ends of the sale there’s a number of bottles which would ordinarily be auction standouts, however, in this sale they feel understandably overshadowed. The Karuizawa 1964 48-year-old for Wealth Solutions finished up at a healthy £16,300 – down a little from its initial forays into auction but still impressive. The Macallan 1948 continues to hold at its new five figure trading level with a hammer price of £12,300. The beautiful Macallan 1949 50-year-old in Baccarat crystal for Japan – a stunning and remarkably hard to find bottle – finished up at £10,200. This really was a sale that belonged to Macallan.

Elsewhere the Black Bowmore 42-year-old held strong at £10,100, repeating the previous result. Interestingly the 1st edition Black Bowmore only fetched £4800, a good price but one which no doubt reflected the lower filling level in this example. This will likely become more and more of a problem in the coming years as these bottles – notorious for their poor quality corks – begin to the suffer the effects of evaporation more and more. Further strong results for Macallan with the 1938 handwritten label fetching a cool £6100, the 40-year-old Pinerolo at £3100 – not long ago these were around the £1200 mark – and the 1950 handwritten at £3500. All showing consistent strong demand. Likewise, the 25-year-old crystal decanter and the 1962 25-year-old Anniversary Malt Macallans settled on £2900 and £2600 respectively – further demonstrating the huge increase in demand there’s been lately for these classic era official Macallan bottlings. Much of this upper section of the sale was a slew of Macallans, most of which were above the £2000 mark, it seems likely that this is set to become the new trading boundary for these older releases.

The Ardbeg 1967 Signatory hit £2150 and the Talisker 1955 £2000, showing that amazing old peat and sherry big beast drams are going nowhere but upwards in value and desirability. Bowmore 30-year-old Sea Dragon showed an impressive leap with a hammer price of £1850 and a second example for £1200, these were very recently around £800-1000 so it will be interesting to see if this represents a new trading level for this bottling. With the high-level Macallans you kind of expect crazy prices now, but the 1990 Exceptional cask selling for £1300 and it’s sibling 1981 bottling for £1250 looks somewhat bewildering, perhaps this is a spike or this often overlooked little series is going to suddenly spring from the shadows.

Other surprises were the Glenlivet Vintages 20cl box set hitting £1100 – especially considering the filling levels. The Clynelish 1972 Rare Malts 57.1% inched past the four figure mark to £1050. It’s hardly surprising these 72 Clynelish Rare Malts are starting to creep up – the liquid inside quite remarkable. Another name that has surprised a few times in recent sales is Midleton; the 1991 bottling fetched an impressive £1050, is this series about to take shift upwards in value?

Similarly £925 looks like a remarkable price for the Bruichladdich 1970 I Was There valinch bottling. These can often be picked up for less than half this price. A 1980s Lagavulin 12-year-old White Horse bottling for £800 suggests this rarity is taking a further rung on the ladder towards the £1000 mark, where it will probably be before too long. Speaking of White Horse a 1940s spring cap example, a 1940s 8-year-old and a 1955 bottling fetched £725 a piece and £700 respectfully. It’s nice to see these older, legendary blends being so appreciated but it’s also curious as White Horse bottlings have been somewhat inconsistent as of late with some older examples selling for a lot less.

The SMWS got a look in with a rare early example of their Ledaig 42.3 selling for £625. From this point in the sale onwards, prices seem to settle back down a bit too consistent levels with most bottlings hitting their upper market values quite consistently. It’s a story of few surprises and even fewer bargains. Although, a Peter Dawson spring cap from around 1950 for £160 and a Laphroaig 10-year-old circa 1990 for the same price both look decidedly drinkable. A Johnnie Walker Black Label from the 1960s for £90 also looks like a no-brainer.

But overall the trends this year seem to be prices rising and bargains getting fewer and further between. Good news for sellers as ever so if you do have a stash of old bottles somewhere, well, you’ll be quids in with today’s market the way it is should you decide to sell.

 

March Auction Highlights

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Selling At Christmas

There are apparently 12 days of Christmas and none are in November. But preparation is often the key to success so, for those of us entangled in the murky but exciting world of whisky auctioneering, it’s time to start thinking about the festive season.

Quite specifically: it’s time for those of us who are thinking of selling to start thinking about the festive season. Mainly because it’s this time of year when there are large, bountiful and extended auctions taking place so that the good folks that run them, month in month out, can take a break along with the rest of us. Here at Whisky-Online the final two sales of the year are usual very strong in terms of results for sellers.

For the penultimate November sale, which runs from November 30th – December 7th, this is the time where lower-mid range bottles tend to perform well in the scramble for Christmas presents and stock for the drinks trays and cabinets of the land. The extra attention is also focused around the top end of the sale for old and rare bottles as this is the time where the first end of year bonuses start to flow and the results are often impressive.

The grand finale, our big annual two-week Christmas sale, which runs this year from December 21st – January 4th, is where things get really interesting. This is the time of year where people are at home, they have time to bid, to spend that extra twenty minutes perusing through a sale with large dram in hand getting ‘in the mood for whisky’. It’s an effect we see every year. Not to mention that many of our buyers are the sort of people who have got extra money in the bank at this time of year and are not shy to spend.

Then, of course, there is the rather unique and long shadow cast over everything this year by Brexit. The weakening effect of Brexit on the pound has led to a surge in prices in recent months at UK auctions. This has been notable particularly for high end ‘top of sale’ bottlings. As buyers in Europe, and particularly the USA and Asia, are given a far easier run at bottles with a softer pound, the one group of people that have really benefited are sellers. It sucks to be a UK buyer right now, but if you’re thinking about selling… well: kerrrrching! Seems the only appropriate word here.

We’re currently accepting consignments for both these sales so if you want to give you’re bottles the best possible chance and achieve a remarkable price, then this is the right time and the right auction house to get them in.

Don’t miss out on our biggest event of the year. Contact us today for your free valuation and expert advice.

Free whisky valuation

Or call now and speak to one of our whisky specialists

Call: 01253 620 376  Mobile: 07767 22 22 00 Email: auctions@whisky-online.com

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Sellers Commission Now 5%

Here at Whisky-Online Auctions we are the top achieving auction house for record prices when it comes to old, rare and antique bottles. Our new 5% sellers commission structure now makes it even easier and more profitable for sellers to capitalise on our ability to achieve these results. We are proactive in marketing your whisky and our website is designed to maximise interest in all bottles, no other auction house will work as hard for you as we do.

If you are interested in taking advantage of selling with us with our new, low, 5% commission rate you can send us a list of your bottles you are interested in valuing via our online form or call us on 01253 620376 and speak directly to one of our experienced valuers.

Free whisky valuation

 

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June Auction Results

Our most recent whisky auction was one of the most impressive sales we’ve had so far this year, both in terms of variety and prices achieved.

The obvious star is the Macallan Lalique 55 Year Old Second Edition. The last time this bottle appeared in our auction – just over 2 years ago in January 2014 – it fetched £12,600. Its final hammer price last night was £25,100, just shy of double its previous best. This demonstrates a couple of things. One is the ravenous market appetite for the serious, official, high-end Macallans. If you have these kinds of bottles now might be the time to start thinking about doing something with them. And, secondly, this is one of an increasing number of examples of bottles achieving well past the £20,000 mark at Whisky Online Auctions. We have a firm track record of achieving the highest price for individual bottles at auction in the UK for the past 3 years now – if you’ve got these kinds of bottles you could do a lot worse than sell them where you are guaranteed this kind of result.

Macallan 55 Year Old - Lalique Decanter - Second Release
Macallan 55 Year Old – Lalique Decanter – Second Release

Going down through the rest of the auction there are more impressive results. It is not often that the second highest bottle in an auction is an independent bottling; then again, it is not often that an independent bottler can produce a 50 year old, dark sherried Glenfiddich with an outturn of only 67 bottles. So perhaps its final hammer price of £7000 is not too surprising.

The Macallan 1945 Speymalt and the 1938 official both fetched consistent and comfortably sturdy results at £5100 and £5500 respectively. In comparison with the 55yo Lalique the 68 year old Speymalt from G&M looks like a downright bargain. Both bottles exemplify the continued appetite there is for these super-aged, exceptional releases from the glory days of Macallan.

The Ardbeg Manager’s Choice 1976 hit a new record high of £3200, it’s good to see appetite for this great and legendary bottling climbing back up again after some softer results earlier this year. The two Brora 1972 Rare Malts hit £3100 apiece, a solid result consistent with the huge level of desirability there is for these bottlings currently. Other encouraging results were the Macallan Royal Marriage, at £2500 it was up a little from its usual £1700-1900 selling range. And the Glenfarclas 40 year old Millennium at £2250 was an impressive result considering it wasn’t all that long ago that these were trading around the £700 mark. This seems consistent with a broader strengthening of Glenfarclas prices at auction lately.

Ardbeg managers choice Graph-05-05

One feature of this auction was a broad selection of releases from the elusive and curious Cadenhead ‘White Label’ series. This was a short lived series of bottlings produced for Oddbins by Cadenheads in the early 1990s. There were some quite remarkable whiskies in it which are now exceedingly rare. A face well evidenced by the prices many of them fetched in this auction. £2400 for the 1965 Springbank, £1250 for the 1972 Clynelish, £1150 for the Glenugie 1980. £925 for the Ardbeg 1978. Once again it goes to show that great liquid commands serious prices, old Cadenhead bottlings are seeing stronger demand than ever and a selection like this from a great and collectable series often creates something of a feeding frenzy effect. Something well worth considering in a tactical sense if you have some of these bottlings and are considering selling.

Cadenhead

Other strong results that broadly represent the sharpening demand for great liquid are: Clynelish 1972 23 year old Rare Malts for £925, Ardbeg Lord Of The Isles for £775 and Laphroaig 1968 Hart Brothers for £875. Some other notable results were the strong performance of Glenmorangie bottlings in this sale. £1150 for the Concorde bottling is sort of to be expected. But £975 for Truffle Oak, £675 for the 1972 single cask, £675 apiece for the two 30 year olds. These are terrific results for a distillery which was flagging a little at auction not so long ago.

Rum is something we don’t often talk about in these reports, but as a spirit at auction it is increasingly gaining traction and seeing impressive results. Six bottles of the Cadenhead’s Uitvlugt 1974 30 year old sold for between £600-650 each, which goes to show the demand for serious, aged rums at auction these days. Remarkable when you consider how cheap these bottlings were originally.

Looking through the auction there wasn’t too much in the way of bargains this sale. Although an 1865 Cognac for £410 seems like the steal of the century given the immense prices that almost all the good bottles in this sale fetched. Goes to show there’s always something in every sale if you are patient, vigilant and smart. And lucky. Some of the older SMWS bottlings seemed a tad more affordable than usual, although priced were very much dependent on the filling levels. The Glenburgie 1960 Connoisseur’s Choice also seems a great bargain for drinking at £215. But apart from that pretty much everything in this sale hit its true market value and bargains were thin on the ground.

commission-10As of our next auction – beginning July 27th – Whisky Online Auctions will be reducing its seller’s commission to 5%. We are the top achieving auction house for record prices when it comes to old, rare and antique bottles. Our new commission structure now makes it even easier and more profitable for sellers to capitalise on our ability to achieve these results. If you are interested to take advantage of selling with us please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

0616 Auction Banner 1000

 

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November Whisky Auction Results

The November whisky Auction finished with the usual mixture of strong and interesting results. The top end results were comfortably within their expected price projections and showed stability at the upper end of the bidding scale.

Perhaps the most telling was the strong result for Ardbeg Provenance at £1400 which shows continued strengthening for this particular bottle from last year’s trading level of around the £1000 mark. The Macallan Anniversary malts also showed continued strong performance with the 1965’s both hitting the £1200+ mark. Another surprise was the Glenlivet 1943 from Gordon & Macphail that – even without a box and a level around the base of the neck – settled on £1000 in the end. Bottle Level Guideline 

Ardbeg Provenance
Ardbeg 1974 – Provenance 1st Edition – 55.6% – Bottle Performance: March 2013 – December 2015

Gordon & Macphail were also around the top end with their beautiful old 15 year old 100 proof Macallan from the thistle stencil series bottled around 1970. The hammer price of £925 goes to show there is continued strong appetite for these kinds of rarely seen, old, exceptional single malts. These kinds of sought after bottles continue to perform very well whenever they show up so if you’ve got one then it might be a good time to think about selling – or drinking – it.

Glendronach shows signs of continued heightening of desirability with its hammer price of £900 for the 1972 40 year old. These old official Glendronachs are showing signs of steady and consistent growth, unsurprising considering the esteemed nature of the whisky itself.

Further consistent strength for older bottlings was shown by the Cadenhead Dumpy Convalmore 1962 bottled exclusively for the US market and the 1976 Ardbeg for Oddbins by Cadenhead selling for £875 and £860 respectively. Older Cadenhead bottlings are going from strength to strength lately and given the scarcity of these kinds of bottling it is unsurprising to see how well these bottles continue to perform.

The more modern releases can also achieve pretty remarkable prices as shown but the Glengoyne 1972 from Malts Of Scotland which sold for £725, this is a great example of a bottle fetching a great price solely on the merits of the reputation of the liquid inside.

Old blends were also shown to be strong performers under certain conditions, the old Glen Moray 53 is a desirable but scarce old blend and this wonderfully preserved example sold for an impressive £575 showing just how well these old blends can perform when the brand, whisky, age and condition all align. The Royal Household from the 1960s at an identical price only served to highlight this further.

There were further strong prices for old Berry Brothers and Queen Of The Moorlands releases which shows that certain independent bottlers with overall strong reputations can perform very well. Older examples of Berry Brother’s bottlings from Bunnahabhain and Glen Grant all achieved strong prices and the Queen Of The Moorlands bottlings all showed continued intense bidding along with the examples we sold last month. These are certainly bottlings that may well be worth selling sooner rather than later if you have them now as the intense competition for these kinds of bottles may be a fluctuation rather than the norm.

Overall this was a strong sale that showed perhaps more impressive prices in the lower – middle ranges of the sale and generally more consistency and steady prices at the upper ends. This could well be attributed to the pre-Christmas phenomena of gift buying and drinks cabinet stocking, or it could well be a continuing trend. Time will tell so it will be interesting to see how things progress in our Christmas sale.

Annual two week special Christmas Sale!

If you’d like to get your bottles into the Christmas sale then we’ll be accepting entries up until the 18th of December. So don’t hang about if you want to take advantage of what is usually one of the highlight auctions of the year in terms of quality of bottles and prices achieved.

Get a free valuation today!

 

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